FREE SHIPPING On Orders Over $99*
CALL TOLL FREE 800-456-9887
ENJOY 10% off + FREE SHIPPING FOR ORDERS OVER $229. USE CODE S10 AT CHECKOUT!U.S. orders only. Some restrictions apply.
Home  >  More About the Neurophone

More About the Neurophone

More About the Neurophone
The Neurophone hasn't been manufactured for several years, and we're unsure when or if it may be available again.

In the meantime, be sure to check out the very popular Echofone.

Neurophone History

Conceived in 1958, the Neurophone Ž, has evolved from a Hi-Fi stereo with a tranducer, metal pads and a plastic bag to a state of the art electronics masterpiece. In 1968, the United States Patent Office issued patent #3,393,279 to Dr. Patrick Flanagan for his nervous system excitation device. Advances in printed circuit board and microprocessor technology had allowed the growth and development of the NeurophoneŽ into previous advanced models throughout the 1980's and 1990's.

Neurophone Technology

The NeurophoneŽ was invented by Dr. G. Patrick Flanagan in 1958 when he was 14 years old. Patrick was a child prodigy in electronics, chemistry and physics. He had discovered an entirely new way to transmit sound into the human brain. Patrick's profound invention has received two United States patents, #3,393,279 and #3,647,970. It took medical science 33 years to discover how the device works.

It has been said that great inventions take 50 years before they are understood. In 1991, Martin Lenhardt of the University of Virginia discovered that human beings have the ability to detect ultrasonic sound when it is transmitted through the skin, bones and liquids of the body. His groundbreaking discovery was published in the prestigious journal Science, Vol. 253, 5, 1991, 82. Lenhardt had duplicated Patrick's original 1958 NeurophoneŽ using sophisticated ultrasonic transducers and discovered that a tiny organ in the inner ear that is normally associated with balance is also a hearing organ for ultrasonic sound.

The organ is called the saccule and is about the size of a pea. It contains nerve endings, called macula, and an otolith, a gelatinous cap containing fine sand-like particles of calcium carbonate called otoconia. When the head is tilted in relation to gravity, the macula signals the vestibulocochlear nerve in the nervous system so that balance can be regained. The saccule has nerve endings that are distributed throughout the brain. Some of these nerves go to the area of the brain that computes sound. Other nerves are distributed into areas concerned with long-term memory.

The NeurophoneŽ transmits modulated ultrasonic sound at 40,000 cycles per second (40 kHz). When we swim with dolphins or whales, we can hear the ultrasonic energy emitted by these mammals through our saccule. By using the NeurophoneŽ, we can train our brain pathways so that we can "hear" through the saccule pathway. It may be that our ancestors could communicate with whales and dolphins by the use of ultrasonic sound. When the NeurophoneŽ is used as an experimental listening device, these pathways are developed and appear to expand consciousness balancing the left and right hemispheres of the brain.

The GPF-1011 DSP NeurophoneŽ has been developed and engineered to provide a means for ultrasonic waves to be interpreted by our brain as "hearing". The technology bypasses the normal audio mechanisms used by the body to hear sound and provides a direct neural stimulation directly to the brain. By bypassing the ears to hear- reading, meditating, studying and learning in general may become easier to comprehend and retain.

Generally, commercial digital speech recognition circuitry is based on a technology called dominant frequency power analysis. While speech may be recognized by such a circuit, a more effective and natural speech encoding is based on time ratios. If the phase of the frequency power analysis circuits are not correct, they will not work. The intelligence (sound) is carried by phase information. The frequency content of the voice gives our voice a certain quality, but frequency does not contain information. Most attempts at computer voice recognition and voice generation are only partially successful. Until digital time-ratio encoding is used, our computers will never be able to truly talk to us. By recognizing and using time-ratio encoding, we could transmit clear voice data through extremely narrow bandwidths.

If the NeurophoneŽ transducers are placed on the closed eyes or on the face, the sound can be clearly 'heard' as if it were coming from inside the brain. When the transducers are placed on the face, the sound is perceived through the trigeminal nerve. There was an earlier test performed at Tufts University that was designed by Dr. Dwight Wayne Batteau, one of Dr. Flanagan's partners in the United States Navy Dolphin Communication Project. This test was known as the "Beat Frequency Test". It is well known that sound waves of two slightly different frequencies create a 'beat' note as the waves interfere with each other. For example, if a sound of 300 Hertz and one of 330 Hertz are played into one ear at the same time, a beat note of 30 Hertz will be perceived. This is a mechanical summation of sound in the bone structure of the inner ear.

There is another beat, sounds beat together in the corpus callosum in the center of the brain. This binaural beat is used by the Monroe Institute and others to simulate altered brain states by entraining (causing brain waves to lock on and follow the signal) the brain into high alpha or even theta brain states. These brain states are associated with creativity, lucid dreamingand other states of consciousness otherwise difficult to reach when awake.

The NeurophoneŽ is a powerful brain entrainment device. If we play alpha or theta signals directly through the NeurophoneŽ, we can move the brain into any state desired. Batteau's theory was that if we could place the NeurophoneŽ transducers so that the sound was perceived as coming from one side of the head only, and if we played a 300 Hertz signal through the NeurophoneŽ, if we also played a 330 Hertz signal through an ordinary headphone we would get a beat note if the signals were summing in the inner ear bones. When the test was conducted, we were able to perceive two distinct tones without beat. This test again proved that Neurophonic hearing was not through bone conduction.

The key to the NeurophoneŽ GPF-1011 DSP is the stimulation of the nerves of the skin with a digitally coded signal that carries the same time-ratio code that is recognized as sound by any nerve in the body.

Imagine a time when trying to concentrate on learning a new activity or concentrating on work and think how easy can be to become distracted by other noises- coworkers, phones, television, etc. Hearing is an amazing sense, however our ears are not selective to the content that they do or do not hear. It is sometimes difficult to focus on the task at hand. The NeurophoneŽ effectively bypasses the ears to "hear without your ears." Information is able to be directly processed in the brain without the distractive input.

The Neurophone hasn't been manufactured for several years, and we're unsure when or if it may be available again.

In the meantime, be sure to check out the very popular Echofone.
VIEW MORE TESTIMONIALS
Toll Free Phone 1-800-456-9887Monday - Friday 8am - 5pm Central Time
Send Us EmailWe reply to email within 24 hours or less.
Join Our Email Newsletter
25 Years of Service
We Ship Worldwide

Translate your Language